How do you know?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With national or world events, most of our conversations (and our arguments) start with us believing the media claims. This is how propaganda controls our minds. Not by controlling everything we think, but by controlling our basic programming.

It’s like the basic CMOS settings in your PC computer. Propaganda terms like “North Korea” + “nukes” serve as the “boot up” commands of our conversations. We think your mind is free, but our initial “boot up” sequence has been chosen for us, and those primary settings govern all our thoughts.

We think we’re smarter than the liars, even as we obey the liars’ commands. And we denounced anyone who questions the commands as a “conspiracy theorist” who needs “”re-educating.”–>

Counterpunch contributor Mike Whitney wrote an article about North Korea that questioned the Empire’s threats against North Korea. However the article was based entirely on Whitney first accepting the Empire’s propaganda. I wrote to him and explained what I am explaining here. He wrote back and agreed with me, and said he would be more careful. But Whitney did the exact same thing in his very next article about North Korea because…programming.

I’m not claiming that North Korea has no nukes. I’m just asking: how do you know? Claims by the lying corporate media outlets are not enough.

Anyway the Counterpunch article proceeds to recount of a history of U.S. hostility toward North Korea. This is an example of what I call the “Yes but…” approach, in which you grant your opponent’s main argument, but you try to spin it in your favor. It never works.

Whenever we hear any claim in support of war, or austerity, or neoliberalism, we must respond with, “Before I agree with you, I must first ask what is your source for your claim.”

Despite all this, I commend the Counterpunch article for its explanation of the historical reasons for the Empire’s hostility toward North Korea. This explanation is based on multiple sources that are not restricted to today’s media claims.

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